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Stitchery Badge

(Discover Art)

(written by Doreen Olson)
    This badge introduces girls to the world of hand stitches. There are many variations on this theme. Girls can earn a general Stitchery Badge first and then go on to specialize with Embroidery, Needlepoint, Cross Stitch, Crewel, and Drawn work Badges as desired OR girls may skip the general hand stitching and do a badge in each separate type of stitching. The only thing to watch for is that if you are doing, for example, a needlepoint badge, that your projects or samplers are all in actual needlepoint. Only Penguins and Otters may use plastic mesh while learning their stitches; other girls need to use fabric. Leaders, please take into account that certain specialties of embroidery do not use a large number of different stitches.

 

Embroidery: Designs or pictures worked in embroidery floss on plain fabric, frequently in a freehand style.

Black-work: A type of counted-thread embroidery normally stitched on even-weave cotton or linen. Traditionally, silk thread was used on white or off-white fabric. Scarlet-work is like black-work, except it is sewn with red thread.
Crewel: Embroidery done with a loosely twisted woolen yarn.

Cross Stitch: Designs (usually counted) worked on a fabric with little squares and holes. Stitches are x’s formed across squares to make the pattern. The areas around the design are usually left blank.

Cut-work: Embroidery in which part of the material is cut away.

Drawn work: Drawing threads from a fabric with the remaining portions having ornamental needlework.

Needlepoint: Counted or free stitches worked on an easily counted thicker fabric called a canvas. A needlepoint design fills up the entire piece of fabric and looks a bit like tapestry.

 

Penguins: Choose three requirements including the ones starred.

_____*1. Learn safety rules when around needles. Never point a needle at someone else or yourself. Whenever you are not using your needle always put it back in a pincushion or other such storage place.

_____*2. Learn two different stitches. You may use plastic canvas and yarn to practice.

 

Otters: Choose four requirements including the ones starred.

_____*1. Do Penguin requirement *1. Make a little fabric booklet OR a small sampler with four different stitches demonstrated.

_____*2. Stitch three small projects (needing close to an hour each) or one larger project that takes at least three hours to complete.

 

Dolphins: Choose five requirements including those starred:

_____*1. Do Penguin requirement *1. Make a little fabric booklet OR a small sampler with at least eight different stitches demonstrated.

_____*2. Stitch four small projects (needing about an hour each) or one larger project that requires four hours of work.

 

Butterflies: Choose six requirements including those starred:

_____*1. Do Penguin requirement *1. Make a little fabric booklet OR a small sampler with at least ten different stitches demonstrated. If you use the same fabric booklet you started as a Dolphin, add four stitches for a total of twelve.

_____*2. Stitch five small projects (needing about an hour each) or one larger project that requires five hours of work.

 

Eagles: Choose seven requirements, including those starred:

_____*1. Do Penguin requirement *1. Make a little fabric booklet OR a small sampler with at least twelve different stitches demonstrated. If you are continuing to add to a previous booklet, you need to have a total of sixteen different stitches. If your type of embroidery doesn’t use that many stitches, combine the ones you have into a new design. This requirement can also be met by helping with a workshop for younger girls, teaching them enough stitches to complete their own little booklets.

_____*2. Stitch six little projects (needing at least an hour each) or larger projects that require six hours to complete.

 

Owl:  Choose nine requirements including those starred:

_____ 1. * Do Eagle requirements 1 & 2

_____ 2. * Teach someone how to do a skill from this badge or teach some knowledge about this badge to someone.   You can teach kids, your spouse, seniors, anyone, just as long as you are sharing your new found knowledge.   If for some reason you cannot teach what you have learned to someone else, you may choose an additional 2 optional requirements instead.

 

Optional Requirements:

_____3. Learn to identify at least three different types of background fabric for hand stitching. (If you are re-earning this badge at a new level and have already done this requirement, you may not repeat it.)

_____4. (Penguins-Otter only) Learn to tell the difference between embroidery floss, crewel yarns, and sewing thread.

_____5. Learn to identify embroidery hoops, various embroidery needles, thimbles, and how to transfer a pattern onto a fabric. Practice putting fabric into an embroidery hoop. (If you are re-earning this badge at a new level and have already done this requirement, you may not repeat it.)

_____6. Go to a museum, county fair, or other exhibit with at least twenty different examples of stitchery. See if you can identify each type of stitching.

_____7. Learn about thread counts, mesh sizes, and the different types of fabric used for your type of stitching. (If you are re-earning this badge at a new level and have already done this requirement, you may not repeat it.)

_____8. (Dolphins-Owls) Learn what silk, wool, cotton, linen, rayon, and polyester are. Learn to tell the difference between embroidery floss, crewel yarns, sewing thread, and crochet thread. (Butterflies and up) Learn what hemp, bamboo, and acrylic are. Find examples of each to examine. Learn to tell the difference between rayon and cotton embroidery floss, crewel yarns, sewing & crochet thread, knitting yarns, and silk ribbons intended for embroidery

_____9. Using some of your own embroidery project(s), make a larger work. For example, use some cross stitch for an apron pocket or some needlepoint to make a pillow. Whatever you use, it can also count for requirement #1 or #2.

_____10. Take a ready-made item (bath or bedroom linen, garment, etc.) and change it with the addition of embroidery. Show it to your troop.

_____11. Enter a finished piece of your embroidery in your county fair, or another competition, or donate it to a shelter or some other charity.

_____12. Find at least two different books that show a lot of photographs of historical embroidery work. Do a book review for your troop.

_____13. Design your own embroidery project. You can do it totally freehand or you can write out the directions for a counted project. Execute the project and show it to your troop.

_____14. Try your hand at machine embroidery. Do at least two projects. What do you like or not like about machine embroidery? How long does it take to learn? How much more money does it take to buy a machine over using just needles and thread?

_____15. Shadow for at least four hours a person who does hand or machine-embroidery for a living. Or you can spend the time with someone who presents seminars or writes books of embroidery projects. You need to observe more than one aspect of the person’s job.